Tag Archives: O’Rourke

Matched Pair ~ Funeral Card Friday

Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, funeral card 1931

Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, funeral card 1931

I’m not sure which saint is depicted in this image, even after trawling through Google images.  Any guesses?

Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, funeral card 1931

Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, funeral card 1931

Of your Charity
Pray for the Soul of
Margaret M. Gaffaney
who died 16th November 1931
On whose Soul Sweet Jesus have mercy.
PRAYER
O Gentlest Heart of Jesus ever
present in the Blessed Sacrament
ever consumed with burning love for
poor captive souls in purgatory, have
mercy on the soul of Thy Servant
Margaret. Bring her from the shadows
of exile to the bright home of heaven
where we trust Thou and Thy Blessed
Mother have woven for her a crown
of unfading bliss. Amen.
R.I.P.

Peter Gaffaney, funeral card 1954

Peter Gaffaney, funeral card 1954

Well this was an easy one to identify, especially since there’s a clue on the other side!

The Immaculate Heart of Mary originally The Sacred Heart of Mary is a devotional name used to refer to the interior life of Mary, her joys and sorrows, her virtues and hidden perfections, and, above all, her virginal love for her God, her maternal love for her Son, Jesus, and her compassionate love for all people…

Traditionally, the heart is pierced with seven wounds or swords, in homage to the seven dolors [sorrows] of Mary. Consequently, seven Hail Marys are said daily in honor of the devotion.1

Peter Gaffaney, funeral card 1954

Peter Gaffaney, funeral card 1954

Merciful Jesus
Grant Eternal Rest
to the Soul of
Peter Dominic Gaffaney
Who died at Rangiora
on 6th July, 1954
O Gentlest Heart of Jesus ever
present in the Blessed Sacrament
ever consumed with burning love for
poor captive souls in purgatory, have
mercy on the soul of Thy Servant
PETER. Bring him from the shadows
of exile to the bright home of heaven
where we trust Thou and Thy Blessed
Mother have woven for him a crown
of unfading bliss. Amen.
Immaculate Heart of Mary
Pray for him.

100 Days

Eternal rest grant unto him
O Lord and let perpetual
light shine upon him.

MAY HE REST IN PEACE

- Amen

I love how they both have the same prayer on the back – even though their deaths were almost 23 years apart.

I’m not sure what the “100 days” signifies on Peter’s card – does it mean that seven Hail Marys should be recited daily for 100 days? I might have to ask someone “in the know”.

Funeral Card Friday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

  1. Wikipedia, “Immaculate Heart of Mary”, article, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immaculate_Heart_of_Mary accessed: 01 Apr 2011.

Why did I not inherit this? ~ Wordless Wednesday

 

Margaret O'Rourke, great grandmother (date unknown)

Margaret O'Rourke, great grandmother (date unknown)

Wordless Wednesday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

Margaret (O’Rourke) Gaffaney ~ Sunday’s Obituary

Not long after my great grandparents, Peter and Margaret Gaffaney, moved to Rangiora in North Canterbury, Margaret died “unexpectedly” at the age of 46 (though her death certificate gives her age as 42) on 16th November 1931.  The cause of death was “Perinephritic Abscess, Toxaemia and secondary Haemoerrhage”.1

My grandfather was just 21 when his mother died, and of course my father and his siblings never knew her.  My poor great grandfather spent 23 years a widower.

Obituary, Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, 1931 (publication unknown)

Obituary, Margaret (O'Rourke) Gaffaney, 1931 (publication unknown)

MRS MONICA MARGARET GAFFANEY, RANGIORA

On November 16, there passed away at Rangiora, Mrs Margaret Monica Gaffaney, wife of Mr. Peter Gaffaney, well-known throughout Canterbury. Death was unexpected, and occurred after an operation necessitated by a sudden illness. Mrs. Gaffaney was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. B. O’Rourke, of Napier. She was educated at the Sacred Heart Convent, Napier, and upon her marriage took up residence with her husband in the South Island. Mr. and Mrs. Gaffaney resided at Fairlie for ten years, following that at Waimate for eight, and had been living at Rangiora for the past three years. The deceased lady was noted for her genial kindness and brightness of disposition, and her charming personality won for her a very wide circle of friends in the South and elsewhere. During her last illness, Mrs. Gaffaney was attended by Rev. Father Leen, parish priest at Rangiora, a close friend of the sorrowing family. At the Requiem there were present in the sanctuary, besides the celebrant (Rev. Father Leen), Rev. Fathers A. Keane and S. O’Connor, of St Mary’s, Christchurch, and Rev. P. Cahill. The Mass was sung by the children of the convent school in the presence of a crowded congregration of relatives and friends. At the graveside in the Bromley Cemetery, Christchurch, the burial service was conducted by Rev. Father P. Cahill, of Hastings, nephew of the deceased, assisted by Rev. Father Leen. Surviving are Mr. Peter Gaffaney, husband of the deceased, and their son Dominic, as well as brothers and sisters of the deceased. R.I.P.

  1. New Zealand, death certificate for Margaret Gaffaney; 16 Nov 1931, Rangiora; citing 1931/10480 Births, Deaths & Marriages, New Zealand.

Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig!

I always knew I had Irish ancestors, but was never quite sure who they were and exactly where they were from.

In the 1990s I spent several years living in Ireland. Oh, when I think of all the research I could have done! But, I was busy studying and working and having fun. Back then, it seemed like every day was St Patrick’s Day, full of craic and lots of Guinness.

I took my family to Ireland for a two week holiday in the summer of 2009. You’d think after living in the place I would have remembered that you don’t go to Ireland for the weather, especially in the summer. The lovely lady at the holiday home company assured me that a heatwave was forecast that year. (Ah, the optimism!) It rained. Well, mostly. Occasionally we saw the sun. One place we visited during a sunny spell was Muckross House, near Killarney in Co. Kerry – with three young kids we declined the 45 minute guided tour around the grand house, and opted to see the Traditional Farms instead, with “three separate working farms (small , medium and large), each complete with animals, poultry and horse drawn farm machinery” as they would have been back in the 1930s and 1940, “a period before the widespread use of electricity”.

Dwelling house, medium-sized farm at Muckross

Dwelling house, medium-sized farm at Muckross Traditional Farms

Scones baking on the fire, Muckross

Scones baking on the fire, Muckross Traditional Farms

Living area of house, Muckross

Living area of house, Muckross Traditional Farms

Since that trip, I’ve not only discovered the names of my Irish forebears and the counties they hailed from, I’ve also recently found a great great great grandfather’s farm in Co. Kerry. Perhaps it was a little like the one we saw at Muckross?

To the Gaffaneys, the O’Rourkes, the Burkes, the Brosnahans, the Burtons, the Powers, and the McGonnells, to you who journeyed across the seas to make new homes in New Zealand, I raise my glass on this day, and thank you for your pioneering spirit and courage.

Unto thee a child is born

Peter and Margaret Gaffaney had two children.  My grandfather, Michael Dominic, was born on 5 September 1910 in Fairlie, Canterbury, New Zealand.  A sibling was stillborn in 1918.

Michael Dominic Gaffaney on his baptism, 1910/11

Michael Dominic Gaffaney on his baptism, 1910/11

I’m not 100% sure who the woman is in this photograph – it is definitely not his paternal grandmother, according to the Gaffaney family historian.  It is most likely to be his maternal grandmother, Bridget Power O’Rourke.  She may also have made the christening gown (and under-gown) that he is wearing.  This is still in the family, passed around to whomever needs it next.  I was baptised in it, as were two of my children.  (It got lost for a wee while, so my eldest son missed out.)

Margaret, Peter and Dominic Gaffaney

Margaret, Peter and Dominic Gaffaney

My grandfather was always called Dominic or Dom, rather than Michael.  Though he was always “Granddad” to me!

Both his parents came from such large families – I wonder if there were lots of miscarriages?

Peter Gaffaney & Margaret O’Rourke ~ Wedding Wednesday

Peter Gaffaney and Margaret O'Rourke, Napier, NZ 1909

Brigid O'Rourke, Peter Gaffaney, Margaret O'Rourke and James Gaffaney, Napier, NZ 1909

I just adore this photograph!  Isn’t it marvellous?  The gloves!  Those hats!  My great grandfather Peter looks quite the dapper lad, and my great grandmother Margaret so much the lady.

Margaret is the daughter of Bartholomew O’Rourke, yer man from Ballymacdonnell, and Bridget Power.  She was born Margaret Mary/Monica O’Rourke on 7 September, 1885 in Napier, New Zealand, the fifth daughter and tenth child of Bartholomew and Bridget.1

Peter is the son of Michael Gaffaney and Margaret Brosnahan.  He was born Peter Dominic Gaffaney on 14 July, 1879 in Temuka, New Zealand, the fourth son and ninth child of Michael and Margaret.2

Peter and Margaret were married in St Patrick’s Catholic Church in Napier, New Zealand on 9 November, 1909.3

Gaffney-O'Rourke, wedding notice, 9 Nov 1909 (publication unknown)

Gaffney-O'Rourke, wedding notice, 9 Nov 1909 (publication unknown)

GAFFNEY – O’ROURKE

St. Patrick’s Church was the scene of an exceedingly pretty wedding this morning when Mr P. D. Gaffney, of Canterbury, was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Margaret Monica O’Rourke, youngest daughter of Mr B. O’Rourke, of the well-known Napier carrying firm. Pontifical high mass was celebrated by the Rev. Father O’Connor, in the absence of the Rev. Father Goggan. Mr James Gaffney, brother of the bridegroom, was best man and Miss B. O’Rourke, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid.

The bride, who was given away by her father, looked charming in a princess gown of ivory chiffon taffeta, yoke of tucked net and trimmed with silk guipure. She wore a large cream picture hat of crinoline straw, with soft tulle ruchings finished at the side with soft flowing plumes. The bridesmaid, Miss B. O’Rourke, wore a pale blue ninon de soie, with yoke and sleeves of ecru net threaded with pale blue bebe ribbon. She wore a large Tuscan straw hat trimmed with cream tulle and embroidery. Miss K. O’Rourke was attired in a gown of cornflower blue eolienne over silk with a yoke of ecru net and beautiful Oriental embroidery. Mrs O’Rourke, mother of the bride, was attired in a gown of black silk, while Mrs McCallum, sister of the bridegroom, was dressed in a brown tailor costume with toque to match.

The bride’s present to the bridegroom was a pair of gold sleeve links, while that of the bridegroom to the bride was a handsome ruby and diamond ring. To the bridesmaid he gave a handsome cameo ring set in pearls.

At the conclusion of the ceremony the guests were entertained by the bride’s parents in St. Patrick’s Hall. Mr and Mrs Gaffney left by the 2.15 p.m. train to spend their honeymoon in the Lakes district of the South Island. The bride wore a navy blue tailor-made travelling dress with hat…

  1. New Zealand, birth certificate for Margaret Mary O’Rourke; 07 Sep 1885, Napier; citing 1885/18916, Births, Deaths & Marriages, New Zealand.
  2. Baptismal certificate for Peter Dominic Gaffaney; 16 Aug 1879, Temuka, New Zealand; copy privately held by [NAME, ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE].
  3. New Zealand, marriage certificate for Peter Dominic Gaffaney and Margaret Monica O’Rourke; 09 Nov 1909, Napier; citing 1909/7835, Births, Deaths & Marriages, New Zealand.

Wedding Wednesday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

The auld sod in 1911

So how are my Rourkes doing on census night in 1911? (See previous two instalments here and here)

Well, everyone’s a little older!  And there’s a couple of grandkids thrown into the mix.1

Bridget Rourke Head of Family 63 Farmer Widow
Michael Rourke Son 37 Farmer’s Son Single
John Rourke Son 35 Farmer’s Son Single
Julia Rourke Daughter 25 Farmer’s Daughter Single
Hannah Hogan Granddaughter 9 Scholar Single
Jeremiah Hogan Grandson 5 Single

Timothy has left, but the other two sons Michael and John, along with daughter Julia, are still at home with their mammy. Hannah and Jeremiah are probably the children of Bridget’s daughter Catherine, who married a Hogan, according to the family tree I have. Catherine’s death date on the tree is given as 1912 – I wonder if it might have been earlier, and the children and are now permanently living with their grandmother?

The house has been upgraded a bit since the last census – its roof is now “Slate, Iron, or Tiles”, there are five rooms instead of three, and five windows at the front of the house (up from three). In the outbuildings stakes, not much change, down 1 cow house and up 1 fowl house. Hopefully the house improvements are a sign the farm is doing well.

I want to follow the Rourke family (roll on the 1926 census!) and also find out where the other family members went to, see if I can verify all the information on this family tree I have.  My knowledge of Irish genealogical sources is a bit lacking at the moment, and I need to spend some time finding out what’s available and where it is.

And I’d love to do more research on the way of life in 19th century Ireland, and into the early 20th century. Would be fascinating to compare the O’Rourke farm in Ballymacdonnell, and the Gaffaney farm in Arowhenua, New Zealand.

  1. Census of Ireland 1911, Kerry, Kilfelim, Ballymacdonnell, House no 3, Bridget Rourke; digital image, The National Archives of Ireland, Census of Ireland 1901/1911 (http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/ : accessed 07 Mar 2011).

The auld sod ~ continued

Following up from yesterday’s post about my great great great grandfather Michael Rourke’s farm in Ballymacdonnell, I’m now looking at the Rourkes who are living there at the time of the 1901 Irish census.

These are the family members listed on the census return1:

Bridget Rourke Head of Family 53 Farmer Widow
Michael Rourke Son 27 Farmer’s Son Not Married
John Rourke Son 24 Farmer’s Son Not Married
Timothy Rourke Son 18 Farmer’s Son Not Married
Julia Rourke Daughter 16 Farmer’s Daughter Not Married

Trying to read the scan of the family tree I have, I can make out a Jeremiah, brother of my Bartholomew, both of whom were Michael Rourke’s sons. Jeremiah married Bridget O’Loughlin, and their children were:

  • Michael b.1873
  • John (Jack) b. 1874
  • Timothy b. 1876
  • Bartholomew b. 1878
  • Catherine b. 1884
  • Julia b.1886

Going back to the baptism records2, I found the following children listed for Jeremiah Rourke and Bridget Loughlin (with their approximate age in 1901, given a birth date a month or two previous to baptism):

  • Michael – 29 Oct 1873 (27) – mother: Margaret Loughlin
  • John – 31 Dec 1875 (25)
  • Bartholomew – 16 Jan 1878 (23)
  • Catherine – 30 May 1880 (20) – mother: Bridget Loughten
  • Timothy – 28 Sep 1882 (18)
  • Julia – 15 Jun 1885 (15)
  • Jeremiah – 23 Jan 1888 (13)

Hurrah! This looks like the same family. Not sure where Bartholomew is on census night, and Catherine may be married by this time. Doesn’t look good for poor young Jeremiah – hopefully he’s having a sleepover at a friend’s place. But he’s also missing on the family tree…

So, were they living in the same house? It’s hard to be certain, without visiting Ballymacdonnell and asking the locals (which I’d love to do at some point!). In 1901 there were three houses inhabited in Ballymacdonnell, and from the census return (Form B1 – House and Building return), all three look to be similar in size and state, being classed as “2nd class”, with Bridget’s being perhaps a little smaller.

What was the house like that Bridget and her family were in? The walls were “stone, brick or concrete”, the roof was “thatch, wood or perishable material”, and there were three windows at the front of the house. The family of five were living in three rooms. Also on their property were eight outbuildings, detailed in Form B2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings: 1 stable, 2 cow houses, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 1 piggery, 1 barn, and 1 shed.

When I came to recheck the map of Ballymacdonnell from Griffith’s Valuation today, I discovered something I had completely missed before! It is laid over the modern map, and using a slider widget at the top right hand side, you can switch between the old and modern maps. How cool is that!!??

Ballymacdonnell - Primary Valuation map3

Ballymacdonnell - Primary Valuation map

Ballymacdonnell - Primary Valuation map and Google maps satellite image

Ballymacdonnell - Primary Valuation map and Google maps satellite image

Ballymacdonnell -  Google maps satellite image4

Ballymacdonnell - Google maps satellite image

There are still buildings there, maybe even the original house.  Next task is to check the household in the 1911 census.

Griffith’s Valuation material (digital images and index) is Copyright of (c)2003 OMS Services Ltd, Eneclann Ltd and the National Library of Ireland

  1. Census of Ireland 1901, Kerry, Kilfelim, Ballymacdonnell, House no 3, Bridget Rourke; digital image, The National Archives of Ireland, Census of Ireland 1901/1911 (http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/ : accessed 05 Mar 2011).
  2. Dept of Tourism, Culture & Sport. “Search Church Records”. Database of transcriptions, church records for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kerry. Irish Genealogy. (http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/ : accessed 05 Mar 2011).
  3. Griffith, Richard. General Valuation of Rateable Property in Ireland… County of Kerry (Dublin: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1861), for Michael Rourke, occupier, Lot 3, Ballymacdonnell (townland), Killeentierna (parish), Trughanacmy (barony); “Griffith’s Valuation,” digital images, Ask About Ireland (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml : accessed 06 Mar 2011).
  4. Google Maps, Ballymacdonnell, satellite image; digital image, Ask About Ireland (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml : accessed 06 Mar 2011).

The auld sod

After I found the baptism records of all those Rourkes,  I wanted to find the place where the family was living.  I had the name of the parish and the townland, so thought I’d have a good chance of finding them in Griffith’s Valuation.

From the Ask About Ireland website:

The Primary Valuation was the first full-scale valuation of property in Ireland. It was overseen by Richard Griffith and was published between 1847 and 1864. It is one of the most important surviving 19th century genealogical sources.1

I know that my family was definitely in the area around this time because of the baptism dates, so I did a search by name on “Rourke” within the parish of Killeentierna. No result. So I tried a place name search on the townland “Ballymacdonnell” instead – result! A Michael Roarke [sic] occupied property lot number 3 – I hadn’t found him initially because of the (transcribed) spelling of his name.
Primary Valuation - headings: Map refs, Names of Townlands and Occupies, Names of Immedidate Lessors, Description of Tenement, Area, Rateable Annual Valuation of Land and Buildings

Primary Valuation - Ballymacdonnell2

Primary Valuation - Ballymacdonnell

 

The Valuation lists the main occupier of the property, not necessarily ‘head of household’ like the census reports. In the report above, Michael’s holding of “House, office, and land” is 37 acres, 2 roods and 21 perches in size. An “office” is a term used to describe “factories, mills and farm outbuildings such as a stable, turf shed, cow barn, corn shed, or piggery.”3 Michael had one office apparently – I wonder what it was?

The taxable value of the property is an estimate of the income the property could generate in a year. The state of the buildings on the property, and the quality and location of the land were all taken into account. The value of Michael’s property, land and buildings combined, was £28 15s. which equates to the spending power of today’s £1,682.74. 4 That doesn’t sound a lot!

The other thing I noted from the report is that in neighbouring lots were two Callaghans – Jeremiah and Michael. Could they be Michael’s brothers-in-law?

Primary Valuation - Ballymacdonnell - Map5

Primary Valuation - Ballymacdonnell - Map. The thicker red lines denote the townland boundaries. Lot 1 of Ballymacdonnell is to the right at the top of the map, below that is Lot 3 and then 2B, and Lots 2A and 4 are over to the left.

 

At this time in Ballymacdonnell there are four lots: two with one house (lots 2 & 3), one with no house (lot 4), and one with two houses (lot 1). From the notation in the far left column, John Griffin occupies 1a, the farmer’s house on lot 1, and Mortimer Flynn occupies 1b, a labourer’s or cottager’s house. As John Griffin is listed in the “Immediate Lessers” column beside lot 1b, it is likely that Griffin was subletting the “House and garden” to Flynn.

I’m interested in the houses because there’s a Rourke family living in Ballymacdonnell in the 1901 census. Are they on the same farm, and in the same house? Are they “my” Rourkes?

Tune in tomorrow!

Note:
1 acre = 4 roods = 40 square perches

Griffith’s Valuation material (digital images and index) is Copyright of (c)2003 OMS Services Ltd, Eneclann Ltd and the National Library of Ireland

  1. Ask About Ireland, Griffith’s Valuation (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml : accessed 12 Nov 2010).
  2. Griffith, Richard. General Valuation of Rateable Property in Ireland… County of Kerry (Dublin: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1861), for Michael Rourke, occupier, Lot 3, Ballymacdonnell (townland), Killeentierna (parish), Trughanacmy (barony); “Griffith’s Valuation,” digital images, Ask About Ireland (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml : accessed 12 Nov 2010).
  3. Ask About Ireland, Griffith’s Valuation – Understanding the Valuation and Maps (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/irish-genealogy/understanding-the-valuati/ : accessed 05 Mar 2011).
  4. The National Archives, Currency converter (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency/default0.asp#mid : accessed 05 Mar 2011).
  5. Griffith, General Valuation of Rateable Property in Ireland… County of Kerry.

O’Rourke family tree ~ Treasure Chest Thursday

Hidden amongst all the photos and documents in my father’s stack of genealogy “stuff”, I came across a faded copy of a hand drawn O’Rourke family tree.  It was barely legible in places, but I could make out quite a few names… including my great great grandfather Bartholomew!

The tree started at Bartholomew’s grandfather and included most of the male lines from Bartholomew’s father down, to about my generation.  There was a key on the side for some colour-coding of those who stayed in Ireland, those who went to New Zealand, and those who went to the United States.  Unfortunately, the colours have gone and it’s all sepia.  However, with the tree was a letter from a relative to my father –  the one who had sent the tree, and he gave the name and address of the relative who had compiled the tree originally.  O happy day!  The letter was written sometime in the mid 1990s, so I will need my father to check whether the people mentioned are still around.

In an earlier post, when I couldn’t find Bartholomew’s baptism record, I listed a family of possible siblings whose baptism records I did find.  These are the names and baptism dates:

Mary – 10 Oct 1837
Ellen – 24 Nov 1843
Johanna – 29 Mar 1846
Margaret – 1 Oct 1848
John – 15 Mar 1850
Catherine – 18 Jun 1852
Bridget – 21 Jul 1854
Honora – 22 Oct 1856
Ellen – 24 Dec 1859

And these are Bartholomew and his siblings as given on the family tree:

  • Mary Josephine b. 1837 d. 1882 (spinster)
  • Jeremiah b. 1840
    • m. Bridget O’Laughan [sp?]
  • Bartholomew b. 1844 d. 1923
    • m. Bridget Power
  • Hannah (Joan) b. 1846
    • m. Brian Hickey
  • Margaret b. 1848
    • m. Thomas Walsh
  • John b. 1850 d. 1936 (changed name to John Callaghan O’Rorke around 1880)
    • m. Mary Fleming
  • Bridget b. 1854
  • Honora b. 1856 d. 1930
    • m. Bartholomew Dennehy
  • Ellen b. 1859

Treasure Chest Thursday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.