Tag Archives: Dickinson

West Yorkshire research trip – Part 4

I posted a photo last week of Rothwell’s market cross – a replica of the medieval one, which originally was close to the current site.  I have several census returns where the address is simply “Near Crop” or “New Cross”, or maybe they are the same?   In the following instances, they look quite distinct:

1861 England census, Rothwell - detail

1861 England census, Rothwell - detail

1871 England census, Rothwell - detail

1871 England census, Rothwell - detail

In fact, the second one may even be “Near Cross”.

Samuel Nunns and his wife Sarah, my Elsie‘s great grandparents, were living at “Near Crop”, Rothwell at the time of the 1861 census.1  Their children were Henry 9, William 8, Thomas 6, Joseph 5, and Sarah 1.  Ten years later, the family are at “New Cross”, Rothwell, and with two more children: John 7 and Charles 6.  Sarah is not listed this time.  The four older boys are now working in the coal mine along with their father.2

By 1881, Sarah is widowed and living at 12 Cross Street with sons William, Joseph, John and Charles.3  Meanwhile, her eldest son Henry has married Tamar Dickinson and is living at 21 Cross Street along with children Sam 7, Elizabeth 5, John 4 and Joseph 1.4

At Rothwell Library, a helpful staff member pointed out the “new cross” on an old map, and mentioned how her family had lived near there.  Perhaps this is the area of “New Cross”?  I was looking for Cross Street which is still there, though most (if not all) of the old houses seem to have gone.  Cross Terrace is also there – did the old houses on Cross Street look similar to these?

Cross Terrace, looking down Cross Street, Rothwell - August 2011

Cross Terrace, looking down Cross Street, Rothwell - August 2011

By 1891, both households had moved from Cross Street, to other streets in Rothwell that I failed to locate during the summer.

This week I discovered a fascinating document – Rothwell Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Plan – which details the town’s historic areas, one of which is Cross Terrace.  Apparently all round that area is the “historic core” of Rothwell.  There’s a whole heap of information about the history of the town and its architecture.  On the Leeds City Council website, there are similar Conservation Area appraisals for other towns, including Oulton.  The references at the end of each document are definitely worth a look, if you’re interested in the local history.

  1. “1861 England Census, Samuel Nunns (35) household, Rothwell, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 30 Dec 2010, digital image, citing PRO RG9/3359, folio 6, page 5, GSU roll: 543120, Hunslet registration district, Rothwell sub-registration district, household 22, 07 April 1861.
  2. “1871 England Census, Samuel Nunns (44) household, Rothwell, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 30 Dec 2006, digital image, citing PRO RG10/4517, folio 6, page 5, household 26, GSU roll: 848472, Hunslet registration district, Rothwell sub-registration district, 02 Apr 1871.
  3. “1881 England Census, Sarah Nunns (56) household, Rothwell, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 05 Aug 2011, digital image, citing PRO RG11/4494, folio 5, page 3, GSU roll: 1342076, Hunslet registration district, Rothwell sub registration district, ED 1, 03 Apr 1881.
  4. “1881 England Census, Henry Nunns (29) household, Rothwell, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 30 Dec 2006, digital image, citing PRO RG11/4494, folio 5, pp 4-5, GSU roll: 1342076, Hunslet registration district, Rothwell sub-registration district, ED 1, household 21, 03 Apr 1881.

A hunting we will go ~ Tombstone Tuesday

Whilst on our trip around West Yorkshire over the summer, my kids and I checked out St John the Evangelist church in Oulton, near Rothwell.  It’s a lovely looking church from the outside, and the graveyard is mostly well kept and fun to play hide and seek in.

St John the Evangelist's church, Oulton, West Yorkshire, August 2011

St John the Evangelist church, Oulton, West Yorkshire, August 2011

St John the Evangelist's church, Oulton, West Yorkshire, August 2011

St John the Evangelist church, Oulton, West Yorkshire, August 2011

I gave my seven and four year olds a slip of paper each with three surnames to search for.   This is what my four year old daughter found:

Gravestone of George & Elizabeth Kemp, also Thomas Kemp,  St John the Evangelist churchyard, Oulton, West Yorkshire

Gravestone of George & Elizabeth Kemp, also Thomas Kemp, St John the Evangelist churchyard, Oulton, West Yorkshire

George and Elizabeth Kemp are my great great great great grandparents.  Buried with them is their son, Thomas.

George Kemp was born around 1811 in Whitley, West Yorkshire.  Elizabeth Dickinson was born in Castleford, West Yorkshire, around 1816.1

They were married at St John’s church in the parish of Wakefield on December 3rd, 1843.  George and Elizabeth were of “full age”.Their fathers were Thomas Kemp, Labourer,  and James Dickinson, Farmer.2

From census returns, they appear to have had four children3:

  • Thomas b. 1847
  • Anna/Hannah b. 1849
  • Sophia b. 1852
  • Sarah Ann b. 1855

In the 1871 census, they had seven year old “adopted child” Georgiana Haigh living with them.4

I am descended from their daughter Sarah Ann.

Gravestone of George & Elizabeth Kemp, also Thomas Kemp,  St John the Evangelist churchyard, Oulton, West Yorkshire

Gravestone of George & Elizabeth Kemp, also Thomas Kemp, St John the Evangelist churchyard, Oulton, West Yorkshire

In
Affectionate Remembrance
of

GEORGE KEMP
who departed this life
January 1st 1882
aged 69 years

I look for the resurrection of
the dead and the life of the
world to come

also ELIZABETH, wife of the above
who died March 26th 1890
aged 75 years

also THOMAS, son of the above
who died October 25th 1895
aged 49 years

Be ye also ready

According to St John’s website, the churchyard is one of the biggest in Leeds, if not the county. George and Elizabeth’s gravestone seems to be in a quite prominent spot, facing the church’s front door.

George and Elizabeth Kemp's gravestone, St John the Evangelist church, Oulton, West Yorkshire

George and Elizabeth Kemp's gravestone, St John the Evangelist church, Oulton, West Yorkshire

My son also found some Cockerham graves and there were several other surnames from our family, but it will take a little digging (sorry, couldn’t resist!) to find out if they are part of our tree.

Tombstone Tuesday is an ongoing series at GeneaBloggers.

  1. “1851 England Census, George Kemp (age 40) household, Altofts, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 05 Jun 2011), citing PRO HO107/2326, folio 395, p 10, GSU roll: 87562-87564, Wakefield registration district, Bretton sub-registration district, ED 11, household 36, 30 Mar 1851.
  2. West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England; Yorkshire Parish Records; Old Reference Number: D145/4; New Reference Number: WDP145/1/1/4, marriage of George Kemp and Elizabeth Dickinson, digital image; Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 02 Sep 2011).
  3. “1861 England Census, George Kemp (age 50) household, Whitwood, Yorkshire,” Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.co.uk/, accessed 05 Jun 2011), citing PRO RG9/3439, folio 99, p 24, GSU roll: 543132, Pontefract registration district, Pontefract sub-registration district, ED 19, household 99, 07 Apr 1861.
  4. “1871 England Census, George Kemp (age 61) household, Oulton with Woodlesford, Yorkshire,” Findmypast, (http://www.findmypast.co.uk/, accessed 10 Jun 2011), citing PRO RG10/4516, folio 68, p 5, Hunslet registration district, Whitkirk sub-registration district, ED 5, household 23, 02 Apr 1871.